Wednesday, May 22, 2024
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Putnam Animal Shelter Looking At Spay And Neuter Clinic

The Cookeville-Putnam County Animal Shelter is looking to open a spay and neuter clinic on-site to help with surging pet overpopulation.

Shelter Director Jennifer Tracy said the idea has floated around since the building was designed and built. She said after doing research, she feels it has become feasible, and more necessary as demand continues to rise. She said the shelter would also hire a Veterinary Medical Director to execute the operations. The idea was discussed at an April Animal Control Board meeting.

“I would say everyone was pretty supportive in understanding the need for it, given the increasing number of animals coming into the shelter,” Tracy said. “And there’s additional benefits of us having a vet on-site.”

The shelter considered taking over for Cookeville’s Major Mike Shipley Spay and Neuter Clinic when it closed down in 2023, but Tracy said she did not have the knowledge and resources to be prepared to run the clinic at that time. She said even with Major Mike’s back up and running under the Wags and Whiskers group, there is a far greater need in the county than what they can service.

Tracy said spaying and neutering offers health benefits, aside from the positive behavioral effects it has on pets. She said a Medical Director would be able to provide general on-site care and offer guidance to those looking to adopt a pet with health issues.

“On the whole, unless you are competing with your animals, or in some sort of forum, or they’re a legitimate working dog, there’s really just no reason for a companion animal to not be spayed or neutered,” Tracy said.

She said other veterinary clinics may offer spay and neuter services, but they are often busy treating pets with different medical issues.

“There’s definitely demonstrated a greater need for it now, and in doing the research and homework, it seems very feasible for us to pull this off and have it fund itself,” Tracy said.

She said she does not have a feel for a timeline yet, but she believes this could become a reality without a need for major contributions from the government.

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