Monday, June 24, 2024
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Dudney Elected To Serve Humanities Tennessee

UCDD Public Historian Mark Dudney named to the Humanities Tennessee board to advance appreciation for culture, literature, and history.

Dudney said Humanities Tennessee is focused on helping the public delve into what the human experience looks like in their community, and what it means. He said the non-profit has developed programs like the Southern Festival of Books and administers grants to help preserve the history of Tennessee communities.

“History and local culture is something that can bring people together,” Dudney said. “We don’t have to agree on everything, but I know people of all stripes who love history and love to get together and talk about it, and I’ve seen that. And I want to encourage that.”

Dudney said during the COVID shutdown, the organization generated Cares Act funding for Upper Cumberland museums to keep them up and running. He said he hopes to contribute to projects like that one to keep the Tennessee cultures thriving.

“To me, in their mission statement, just the words, ‘To foster civility and community,’ appeals to me,” Dudney said. “I’m happy to be part of an organization that’s advancing those goals.”

He said Humanities Tennessee has completed several oral history projects, and he would feel fulfilled in his service with the organization if he were able to participate in such a project. He said he is also excited for the organization to launch its new Tennessee Book Award this year which will recognize local authors and contribute to recording elements of local culture for future generations to learn about and enjoy.

“How you make that public programming, is trying to take those subjects and help communities and other like-minded entities advance those subjects in the public realm,” Dudney said.

A new round of grant opportunities opens April 1, Dudney said. He said as he learns more about this work, he aims to raise awareness of these opportunities in the Upper Cumberland and contribute to the work that breaths new life into the rich history and culture of the region.

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